Author Archive

NICK SPOONER’S POSTHUMOUS BOOK   Leave a comment

I just posted the following on Nick Spooner’s Facebook page.

Remembering Nick Spooner. Gone too soon, he should have been a writer. But now see his posthumously published book based on his own words as presented on Facebook. Look on amazon.com for “This Sucks! I Want to Live” by Nick Spooner. Or order it from your local bookstore. https://www.amazon.co.uk/This-Sucks-I-Want-Live/dp/1950743357/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=This+sucks%21+I+want+to+live&qid=1610220075&s=books&sr=1-1

EVOKING MEMORIES OF MY OWN UPBRINGING   3 comments

I enjoyed reading this book aloud with my friend whose vision is limited by Macular degeneration. It evoked many memories of my own upbringing as I recognized similar personalities in my family, bringing back happy and sad events and circumstances. Doesn’t every family have them! 

I appreciated Mona’s on-going descriptions of what was taking place in world events starting with WW !, immigration, the Great Depression (I heard a lot about that from my own grandparents and parents!), re-building the Nation, Pearl Harbor, WW II, The Korean Conflict, crystal sets, radio, air flights, etc During the reading of this book I found myself looking back at so many past memories of my life and being grateful for the wonderful, loving family into which I was born.

I wondered whether the author’s selection of psychology as her life career reflected her upbringing and family’s trials and tribulations? It was so sad and frustrating to see Jennie’s decline even as we witnessed her husband’s sustained adoration and love of his wife during these difficult times.

This was not a particularly uplifting book but an honest and comprehensive description of a loving, ambitious and talented immigrant who conquered the many challenges presented him in order to become the successful, respected and loved man that he was. His love for God, his community and his family is evident.

Congratulations to Mona for publication of this story that has obviously been a “work in progress” for many years. It is a wonderful and complete tale of “My Father’s House.” As for the author’s style, I enjoyed reading the minute details and highly descriptive passages. Some readers, however, might not appreciate this style.

This review can be found on my web site

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A NORWEGIAN REVIEW OF “MY FATHER’S HOUSE.”   4 comments

This review can also be found on my web site forgivenessoptions.com

I see this as a block buster movie

At the end of the book, I thought that if Metro Golden Meyer hooked this, it would be a block buster. The characters are lovingly and distinctly portrayed with all their strengths and foibles, and their development through times of war, depression and into the seventies. I grew fond of  Father Carl – born in 1880 and emigrating from Sweden  1910.

For this Norwegian reviewer it was overwhelming to try to remember all the names of the characters – but still I found myself  reading in bed at 04 am, wondering about how Jennie and the family would cope with her “sensibilities” – I will not tell  the readers how that went. Among the clear descriptions of life in these times,It was such a clear and loving tale of how too much consideration can devastate a persons life. “Let’s not borrow trouble” was the fathers adage, it seems the family adapted it too – as we humans do, with grave consequences.

 Mona’s professorate  in Psychology and her interventions created a strong and dramatic change in the family –  the last chapters were a great eye-opener of what happens when the cat in the sac gets out – and the fresh new air pours in.

4 stars – reflecting the bit overwhelming number of names and relationships.

I feel well fed after reading it.

Leelah Saachi

And grateful;

Writer

I SEE THIS AS A BLOCK BLUSTER MOVIEAt the end of the book, I thought that if Metro Golden Meyer hooked this, it would be a block buster. The characters are lovingly and distinctly portrayed with all their strengths and foibles, and their development through times of war, depression and into the seventies. I grew fond of  Father Carl – born in 1880 and emigrating from Sweden  1910as a block buster movie

LOST REVIEWS FOR “MY FATHER’S HOUSE?”   1 comment

At last count of reviews of “My Father’s House” I found five more “ratings” than there are reviews on amazon.com. Somehow I doubt that five people would have bothered to rate without writing a review. Knowing that the accepting/rejecting algorythms operate in mysterious ways, I suspect some of the lonely “ratings” went with reviews that never got published. I know of one person who tried three times to get hers posted. The third time was the magic. But she was never notified that her first two had not been accepted. Obviously I treasure any reviews, so here’s my question. Did any of you write one that you don’t see posted? If so, I’d be most happy if you would keep trying

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Posted November 30, 2020 by Mona Gustafson Affinito in Uncategorized

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I think my next book’s title will be “I am a dinosaur.”   2 comments

I just finished writing a review for Ijeoma Oluo’s “So You Want to Talk About Race.” Here it is.

Having read a plethora of books as a member of our “BLM Ally” group I didn’t expect another one could add much. But I was wrong. It was probably the chapters organization that made the difference, but I left it with my heart hurting and my mind brimming. And there were the specific lists – almost “to-do” — that helped as we search for actions we can take while we are confined by COVID-19 restrictions. No matter what reading you have already worked through you’ll find help presented here in an attractive writing style.

So what does that have to do with dinosaurs? Me — and my career.

In the process of writing — and editing a zillion times — My Father’s House, I have come to appreciate that I did lead a privileged life. I confess, I didn’t know it. I was too busy living it. I do remember being upset in High School when I read about Senator Bilbo, though, described in Wikipedia as “a filibusterer whose name was synonymous with white supremacy.” I wish I had saved the essay I wrote.

But that doesn’t make me a dinosaur. It’s my career that did that. I spent years teaching developmental and personality psychology. Now I’d have to rewrite the syllabus, realizing that it was all about white, probably Northern European folks. And the psychology of women? Not only did it not even include women of the top 1%, it also wasn’t about women of any color other than pale white.

Okay, that’s all you get. I’ll save the rest for later. But I hope you get the gist.

No, I don’t feel guilty. Just more aware and motivated.

 

The saying on the wall   Leave a comment

My niece and I were remembering my father’s house last evening when she recalled a saying that hung on the wall in the foyer. I don’t remember it on the wall, but I do remember the saying — so characteristic of my mother and so appropriate for these times.


There’s so much bad in the best of us
And so much good in the worst of us
That it ill behooves any of us
To talk about the rest of us.

The thought for the day

Posted October 21, 2020 by Mona Gustafson Affinito in Uncategorized

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I’VE CONNECTED WITH THE NEW OWNERS OF MY FATHER’S HOUSE   8 comments

How exciting is that! First of all, what a blessing to have lived in the same house from the time I was born until I left for college, graduate school, and early career. Only marriage made the break official. And now, having published “My Father’s House,” I’ve been in contact with the current owners. The photos they’ve provided show me the place is even more beautiful in its modern version. I’m thrilled.

Maybe you’d like to take another look at it on the cover of the book

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Posted October 19, 2020 by Mona Gustafson Affinito in Uncategorized

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HAVE YOUR FINISHED READING “MY FATHER’S HOUSE?   2 comments

If you have finished reading “My Father’s House” and didn’t hate it, would you be willing to give me some feedback? Or even post it on amazon.com? I’d love to know what you think. Thanks, Mona

Posted October 4, 2020 by Mona Gustafson Affinito in Uncategorized

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GRATITUDE   10 comments

This morning I woke up in the same bed I’ve enjoyed for many years, under covers of just the right weight and temperature. I expect to return to the same comfortable bed tonight. I did the lying down exercises I had been taught back in 2015 after my accident — physical therapy lessons, like all other treatments after the crash, covered by insurance. I lolled in bed for a while playing some games on my cell phone and checking emails, knowing I didn’t have to worry about the battery running low, because I’d be plugging it in as soon as I rolled out of bed, into an outlet that I was sure would provide the juice to recharge.

Once I was up I did more of my exercises accompanied by the local TV station emanating from an old but perfectly fine set nestled in my bedroom cabinet where other shelves and drawers house my supply of clothes from which I would chose todays outfit. (comfortable but not fancy – still pretty much confined to my sunny senior apartment, protected not only from the weather, but – more important – from the virus.)

Eventually I turned on my shower, confident that nice warm water would emerge from the shower head, allowing me to enjoy soap that I have in sufficient supply, aided by a washcloth and later a drying towel which I can keep clean in the washing machine in the laundry room.

And then breakfast, an adequate supply of nuts and fruit and eggs kept fresh in the refrigerator next to the stove on which I was confident I could cook my egg because the burners would turn on as soon as I dialed the appropriate knob.

Finally to my computer which usually responds to my command, like the other appliances that have enjoyed the adequate supply of electrical power.

Pretty standard stuff, unless you do – as I do every morning – think of the people who don’t have these things. No guaranteed source of power, maybe because no guaranteed place to sleep and eat, or maybe because where they live power is sporadic. Maybe no assured fresh food or warm water – even clean, pure cold water – ready on call. No insurance available to keep healthy teeth and bodies. So many people who don’t have these things I take for granted every day. Yes, I am filled with gratitude – and also pain for all those who suffer.

The other side of gratitude is awareness. Without both, life would be pretty empty, I think.

Just my ruminations on living another normal day – normal for us fortunate ones.

Posted September 28, 2020 by Mona Gustafson Affinito in Uncategorized

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A BETTER PHOTO OF THE TURSAS CHURCH   3 comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I wish this photo had been available to me when I inserted the Torsas church into my book.

Thanks to James Carros, a Bristol, Connecticut person whose family, like mine, hails from Torsas. It’s a much better photo of the church than the one I found for

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Posted September 14, 2020 by Mona Gustafson Affinito in Uncategorized

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